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MATerials
MATerials, Interfaces, Surfaces, Environment

Sydney & SU virtual workshop - Theme #3: Materials and Catalyse

October 28, 2020 - 5:00 pm (Sydney time)

After the themes of energy and then biomaterials, the University of Sydney, Sorbonne University and iMAT will be exploring the state of research in the field of catalysis on Wednesday 28 October.

This workshop is part of the strategic partnership between Sorbonne University and the University of Sydney to stimulate scientific exchanges and create synergies between research teams. It is the 3rd in a series of 4 thematic workshops on key areas in materials science in the two universities.

The last workshop of the series will be dedicated to optics on November 4th.

Informations

  • Date: mercredi 28 octobre 2020
  • Schedule: 08:00 - 9:30 heure de Paris/17:00 - 18:30 heure de Sydney
  • Location: Webinaire Zoom

Registration :  https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/sydney-and-sorbonne-joint-workshop-on-materials-science-catalysis-tickets-124643408791

Programm

Accueil

  • 5:00 - 5:10 :Prof. David McKenzie, Professor of Materials Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, and Prof. Xavier Carrier, Surface Reactivity Laboratory (LRS), Sorbonne University

Thème #1 : Identification of active sites

  • 5 :10 - 5 :20 : Prof. Hélène Pernot, Surface Reactivity Laboratory (LRS), Sorbonne University
  • 5 :20 - 5 :30 : Dr. Jun Huang, School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Sydney

Thème #2 : Materials for catalysis

  • 5 :30 -5 :40 : Dr. Sophie Carenco, Chemistry of Condensed Matter Laboratory (LCMCP),Sorbonne University
  • 5 :40 -5 :50 : Prof. Cathy Stampfl, School of Physics, University of Sydney

Thème #3 : Modelling (surface sciences)

  • 5 :50 - 5: 00 : Dr. Ahmed Naitabdi, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique - Matière et Rayonnement (LCP-MR), Sorbonne University
  • 5 :00 - 5 :10 : Prof. Thomas Maschmeyer, Professor of Chemistry, School of Chemistry, University of Sydney

Discussions, Conclusions and Next Steps

  • 5 :10 - 5 :30 : Prof. David McKenzie, Professor of Materials Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, and Prof. Xavier Carrier, Surface Reactivity Laboratory (LRS), Sorbonne University

Contacts

  • Rakhee Patel, Responsable de Partenariats Internationaux à la Direction du Développement International de Sorbonne Université : +33 1 44 27 35 01 ; rakhee.patel [@] sorbonne-universite.fr
  • Emmanuel Sautjeau, Chargé de projet iMAT : emmanuel.sautjeau [@] sorbonne-universite.fr

26/10/20

Participants

Animators

Xavier Carrier

Surface Reactivity Laboratory (LRS), Sorbonne University

Xavier Carrier is Professor at LRS, Sorbonne University, working on the synthesis of inorganic materials for heterogeneous catalysis. He obtained his PhD at University Pierre & Marie Curie and spent one year at Stanford University (California) as a post-doctoral fellow in the Department of Geological & Environmental Sciences. His research interests include the use of complementary spectroscopic techniques for a molecular-scale understanding of physico-chemical phenomena involved in the preparation of supported catalysts.

 

David McKenzie

Professor of Materials Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney

David McKenzie is Professor of Materials Physics, School of Physics at the University of Sydney. He is Member of the Applied and Plasma Physics research group and the Charles Perkins Centre. His research interests lie in areas that include materials physics, plasma deposition and processing, thin film materials, vacuum glazing, renewable and sustainable energy and cross-disciplinary research in the areas of biointerfaces and interactions of biosystems for medicine

 

Speakers

Sophie Carenco

Chemistry of Condensed Matter Laboratory (LCMCP), Sorbonne University

Sophie Carenco is a researcher at the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, working on nanochemistry at the Laboratoire de Chimie de la Matière Condensée in Paris. She obtained her PhD in 2011 from University Pierre & Marie Curie, Paris, for her work on the synthesis and applications of metal phosphide nanoparticles, and she was a post-doctoral fellow at Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, Berkeley, California. She works in the team Nano on novel synthetic routes of exotic nanomaterials for energy-relevent challenges such as CO2 valorization.

Jun Huang

School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Sydney

Associate Professor Jun Huang was educated at the Institute of Chemical Technology at the University of Stuttgart, Germany. He received specialised training in catalysis at the South German Catalysis Institute by nine renowned professors and an emerging course of Biorefinery Technology and Renewable Raw Materials organized by DECHEMA. After obtaining his PhD degree in 2008, Dr. Huang moved to the School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at Georgia Institute of Technology, USA for his Postdoctoral research. He joined a strategic energy project of catalytic routes to fuels from biomass supported by Chevron. In 2009, he started to develop novel catalysts and processes for green chemicals and biofuels in the Institute of Chemical and Bio-Engineering at ETH Zurich, Switzerland. He was appointed Lecturer at The School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at The University of Sydney in 2010 and Associate Professor in 2015.

Thomas Maschmeyer

School of Chemistry, University of Sydney

Professor Thomas Maschmeyer is Professor of Chemistry at the University of Sydney, serves as Founding Director of the Laboratory of Advanced Catalysis for Sustainability (School of Chemistry), and is Executive Chairman of Gelion Technologies. For three years until March 2017 he also served as Founding Director of the University’s new $150m Australian Institute of Nanoscale Science and Technology (AINST, now “Sydney Nano”). His research interests include: Catalysis, Sustainable Processes, Renewable Feedstocks (Biomass, Solar, Hydrogen), Ionic Liquids, Micro- and Mesoporous Nano-Structured Materials and Reversible Energy Storage Devices.

Ahmed Nait-Abdi

Laboratoire de Chimie Physique - Matière et Rayonnement (LCP-MR)

Ahmed NAITABDI is associate professor of physical-chemistry at Sorbonne Université (SU) in Paris, since September 2012. He is also the deputy-director of Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Matière et Rayonnement at SU. He earned his PhD in condensed matter physics in December 2004 from Université de Starsbourg, France. Afterwards, he was a Postdoctoral research fellow from 2005 to 2008 in the Department of Physics at the University of Central Florida, Orlando, USA where he worked on the synthesis and investigations of metal-oxide-supported size-selected metallic nanoparticles relevant for heterogeneous catalysis applications. His current research focuses on the Nanocatalysis of model systems, including metal-oxide ultrathin-films and metallic & bimetallic nanoparticles. In particular, he currently focuses on the operando and in situ investigations of catalytic reactions, especially the CO2 hydrogenation for methanol synthesis.

Hélène Lauron-Pernot

Surface Reactivity Laboratory (LRS), Sorbonne University

Helène Lauron-Pernot is Professor of chemistry at the Faculty of Science and Engineering of Sorbonne Université and director of Laboratoire de Réactivité de Surface. She works in the field of heterogeneous catalysis and her research interest is focused on structure-activity correlations for applications needing acido-basic properties. She is particularly involved in the development of model reaction networks for the characterization of surface basicity. Her presentation will concern the work on catalytic reactivity carried out by various researchers from SU.

Cathy Stampfl

School of Physics, University of Sydney

 

 

 

 

 

21/10/20

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